Safety first or last?

Someone seems to have stuck a stick of dynamite up my GP’s backside and blasted him into the 21st century. Last month, out of the blue, the receptionist told Adam, that they now have a website through which we can now order my prescriptions and book appointments, without having to phone. I checked it out with total excitement, yes, my world has become that limited, and when I read the leader page, my excitement grew. There was my dream, access to my personal files. It didn’t last long, as it turns out it is up to each GP individually to decide if they want to open our notes this way or not, mine has chosen the not. I had also hoped that I might be able to request a phone call, since clearly I don’t need appointments, but no luck there either. On the good side, we can at least put in the prescription requests.

Then yesterday morning, the phone rang, it was a call from my doctor, well not quite, it was from the surgery number. There was this woman who introduced herself as the practise pharmacist. I wasn’t even sure that the practise employed a cleaner, far less something as posh as a pharmacist, so I was somewhat shocked. No, I’m not implying the building is dirty, it’s just I wouldn’t have been surprised to discover the receptionists were also the cleaners. Anyway, the pharmacist was calling to check that I was taking the correct dose of one of my drugs. There was an error in the dosage on her screen which I had spotted on the pack when it arrived here. Because I knew what I should have been taking, I had ignored it, but she sounded as though she was more than a little concerned and told me that I must only ever take one puff twice a day, not the two on the label. It was clear from the quantities we had been ordering that that was in fact, what I was already doing. It set me thinking about who is supposed to check what, as accidents can undoubtedly happen, we are all human after all. This one, surprised me, though, as I have been on that inhaler now for well over two years, and it has been supplied by at least two different chemists. The original prescription had been requested by my consultant, my doctor then wrote it up, and it has been in the hands of several pharmacists, but suddenly, out of the blue, one stopped and checked it that bit more closely, what happened to all the others?

We automatically assume when a drug arrives in our hands, that we have the right drug, with the right dosage instruction written clearly on it. I have never once, looked further than that. I’ve never checked online to see what the recommended dosage is, or questioned anything about any drug when first prescribed. I suspect, the same can be said for all of us, we assume, we expect and we believe that it is always correct. I know that in the past on two separate occasions a chemist has refused to fill one of my prescriptions, without first talking to my doctor. On both occasions, it has been the same thing, the very high dosage of steroids that I at times need for flares. They both wanted to double check them, as the dosage is off the scale for most people. That, I believed until yesterday, was the safeguard, the pharmacist. This time, I was lucky, when I started taking it, I remembered what my consultant had said about it, and how to take it, so I knew. That was pure luck, as normally, I remember nothing and by now I could have been taking a double daily dose for nearly 2 years. It appears that all our medications safety relies on, is luck. Is that really a good thing to work with, just luck.

Lately, we are being repeatedly told that if you can’t get an appointment with you doctor, and your condition is minor, to consult your local pharmacists. The TV ads portray this well-educated person, just a step below our own GP’s, who’s knowledge is vast and that we can trust, trust to prescribe us the correct treatment for what ails us. Long long before those ads appeared, in fact, for a lot of my adult life, that is exactly what I have done, for anything not serious enough for a doctor’s attention. I’ve watched them filling prescriptions, two of them side by side, apparently checking all is correct. I have even seen some, flicking through drug manuals, I thought to check dosages or any detail, they were uncertain about. For 2 years, my prescription has been in the hands of what must be dozens of these professionals, yet only now, one spots the error? Why?

In this case, there was no danger, but it could have been a very different story. There are a million and one drugs out there that could have killed me long ago, some of which I am actually still on. It has made my realise that maybe, just maybe, that in the future it might just be worth checking ourselves, something that these days, it’s easy to do. At our fingertips, is the exact same information those well paid professional use daily. Putting in one more check as we start yet another new drug, might just save us problems in the future.

 

Please read my blog from 2 years ago today – 17/03/2014 – Still longing

I used to think that when I grew up I would know the answer to everything and that my life would flow smoothly as I would have nothing left to learn. It’s amazing just how wrong a child can be and how far from even scrapping the surface I am from actually knowing anything. All of us have a million questions daily, some small, some amazingly big, but in our minds at the second they appear they feel just the same. I never got the chance to do so many things in my life that I wanted to do, not because anything really stopped me but more because life just took over, time pasts and somehow those things just became unimportant. The places I wanted to go, the……

 

 

 

 

 

7 thoughts on “Safety first or last?

  1. After a scare early on, I’ve always checked. It’s too easy for it to be wrong if there are not the right checks in place. Doesn’t bear thinking about. The pharmacists here in Crete (and one assumes Greece) are far more knowledgeable than any I have ever come across in the UK.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. HI, PAMELA. I’VE BEEN THINKING OF YOU. MY HEALTH HAS TURNED FOR THE WORSE. THAT IS WHY MY COMMENTS ARE FEW; BUT I DO MISS MY MORNINGS WITH YOU. I TRUST NOBODY. I KEEP AND DOUBLE CHECK EVERY MEDICINE THAT GOES INTO MY MOUTH. THE LAST POST YOU WROTE THAT I READ; YOU MENTIONED YOUR MORPHINE DOSAGES HAVE BEEN INCREASED. PLEASE, ONLY BECAUSE YOU ARE MY FRIEND, I ASK YOU TO BE CAREFUL. ONE EXTRA DOSE AND YOU COULD GO INTO CARDIAC ARREST. I KNOW YOU KNOW THAT, BUT IT SCARES ME, TO THINK THAT I’LL HAVE NOBODY TO TALK TO WHEN/IF, MY HEALTH IMPROVES………………SENDING LOVE, NEVI

    Liked by 2 people

    • Don’t worry about me Nevi, it sounds as though you have enough to worry about with your own health. As I have said to you many times, you don’t have to have the strength to write anything. As you know, you can read any time. Take care of yourself and your daughter. (((Hugs)))

      Liked by 1 person

  3. As we automate more and more, and remove the time needed to do more than rush through a job timed against a clock, mistakes like this may happen. It sounds like the new hire at your practise, the pharmacist, may have set herself a personal chore to review every (new to her) patient’s file to ensure accuracy. I’m glad you have someone with personal diligence acting to protect the health of the patients. Bravo.

    Liked by 2 people

    • In so many ways, automation should make things more actuate, but the human factor always has to be taken into account, from either end of the system. I for one, are glad to know she is there, but she isn’t there for the rest of the world.

      Like

  4. One thing I have to really watch out for is inactive ingredients. I have allergies and some meds have a lot of stuff. Get a generic and they change the manufacturer and bam, a mess.
    My pharmacist knows what I can’t have and isn’t supposed to fill my Rx with anything that could cause a reaction, but they don’t.
    I specifically asked about one med and the pharmacist said that Fructose would only be in liquids…no so. The drug I got made me sick. I looked it up and right there, fructose.
    I had a pharmacist catch something late. One of my meds stopped birth control from working. I had been taking it 3 months, and was late when she told me. Luckily no baby, but that could have been a mess!

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s